How to Spend the Summer in Cornwall

Cornwall is close to beaches, lake or sea fishing, and camp grounds with all of the comforts of home. It is a perfect place to take the Caravan or go glamping for almost any length holiday. Perran Springs is a pet-friendly holiday campsite that offers accommodations for all campers. Clampers and naturists love the site.

Cornwall is one of my favorite places close to London. The temperature is always perfect, and so many people from all over the world go there to camp, hike, swim, fish, and just relax. Cornwall also offers delectable must-try local food and beverages. Here’s a short list of things I like to do in Cornwall in the summer.

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Explore Outdoors. Parts of the Cornwall area coast are still considered “secret” spots. For instance, Frog Prince Cove, named for its adjacency to Frogmore village—and a frog-shaped rock at the cove—offers pristine beaches and clear waters. Frog Prince Cove is an ideal place to swim and explore the amazing rocks. When in Cornwall, ask residents and make sure to visit this gorgeous spot. I’m still wondering if there is a story behind the frog prince name, so be sure to let me know if you learn more.

If you love marine life as I do, consider a swim with dolphins. To swim with Cornwall’s dolphins, it’s necessary to swim in the ocean. There are no captive dolphins or “swim with dolphin” pools here. If swimming with dolphins in Cornwall is something you want to do, plan to swim in late morning to afternoon. Guide hire is recommended. Lots of visitors to Cornwall are thrilled at how friendly wild dolphins pods are, but remember—stay close to shore and don’t swim alone.

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Beaches. Visitors should also check out the beaches on Cornwall’s beautiful, varied coastline. The sand is often golden at the coast or has a “salt and pepper” appearance in cove areas. Picturesque rock pools are places to take lots of photos because friends and family will oooooh and aaaaah at the diverse natural beauty here. Some of my favorite beaches in Cornwall include

  • Daymer Bay (fantastic views, a good beach for families with children and dogs and building sandcastles, also wheelchair-accessible path to St. Enodoc);
  • Porthcurno, a golden beach with crystal clear water. Watch the fishes swim, including placid, nonthreatening basking sharks at low tide. Close-by open air Minack Theatre also attracts visitors.
  • Perranporth is a beach for families and explorers: visit the dunes, rock formations, or fields or nearby fields of wildflowers in the summer;
  • Pednevounder, at the western point of Cornwall, is considered by “Bare Britain” as one of the top five nude beaches. Nude and bathing suit-clad bathers equally share the clean yellow sand. Rock formations, such as internationally-famous, 65-ton gigantic Logan Rock, stand at one hundred feet above sea level.
  • Gwenver Beach tends to be less crowded and pet-friendly. There are summer lifeguards and the swimming is excellent most days. When the wind picks up, surfers and body boarders also enjoy this very pretty beach.
  • Porthluney is a large, sheltered beach area that faces the south. Gothic Caerhays Castles stands nearby, and visitors enjoy the castle gardens that open each spring.
  • Gwithian Towans offers an incredible three miles of dunes. Surfers flock to the beach and local wetsuit and bodyboarding enthusiasts shop at various retailers along the beach road here.

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Fishing. Cornwall is positioned at the peninsula of southwestern England and is surrounded by the English Channel (east side) and Celtic Sea (west side). Both sea and inland fishing options are plentiful in Cornwall. Beach and rock anglers as well as deep sea fishermen (including reef and wreck specialty boats) enjoy the area with charter boats. Fish for mackerel, dogfish, squid, John Dory, red/grey mullet, rays and many others from all locations. Reef and wreck fishing is exciting in the summer—it’s possible to catch eels and larger fish during the summer months.

Inland fishing, in stocked lakes and ponds in Cornwall, is a great way to add sport to a relaxing camping vacation. If you catch a “big one,” make sure to take a photo to share. Bring your own gear or take advantage of a local fish and tackle shop.

Art Galleries, Museums and Gardens. Art lovers will love the variety of art galleries and workshops in Cornwall. Cornwall is also the home of a long list of museums. Many of these museums are labors of love and run completely by volunteers. There are fifty-four Cornwall museums! No matter what your interest, it is easy to find a nearby fascinating museum. Since gardens and England go together, commune with beauty at any or all of Cornwall’s gorgeous gardens. There are forty to choose from.

Food, Beverages and Dining in Cornwall. Handmade Cornish ice cream made at local dairies is one of the most heavenly foods on earth. Take cream tea as often as possible: try freshly baked scones with local clotted and/or whipped cream. Don’t forget to include summer jams.

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Where to stay in Cornwall. Our readers know that hotels and lodging are often the most costly part of the travel plan. A holiday park for nature lovers is a good choice for a visit to Cornwall. Select a central location, such as Perran Springs Holiday Park, and achieve access to beaches (the golf course and beach at Perranporth are about two miles away), activities and restaurants (Newquay is just five minutes away by car). Caravan owners will find a great hard standing area and access to electricity. Clean and free shower facilities are available to all visitors. A natural trail and lots of wildlife is gentle scenery for the holiday at this friend and family-run campsite. Address: Goonhavern, Truro, Cornwall TR4 9QG, United Kingdom. Tel: +44 1872 540568

 

One thought on “How to Spend the Summer in Cornwall”

  1. Mikey says:

    Some great beach suggestions here. I hadn’t heard of Frog Prince Cove or Pedn Vounder before.

    My family are heading down to Cornwall a holiday this summer and it’s a few years since we were last there, so it’ll be great to try something new as well as revisit old favourites.

    http://www.campsites.co.uk/guides/ultimate-cornwall-visitor-guide
    We’ve been using this guide to try and decide where to stay. At the moment, we’re erring towards St Agnes, because we’ve tended to go further south on previous visits and the stretch of coastline around there seems to have most of the best beaches.

    What do you think? Have you been there?

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